Comparison of velocity-based and traditional percentage-based loading methods on maximal strength and power adaptations

Dorrell, Harry and Smith, Mark F and Gee, Thomas (2019) Comparison of velocity-based and traditional percentage-based loading methods on maximal strength and power adaptations. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research . ISSN 1064-8011

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Comparison of velocity-based and traditional percentage-based loading methods on maximal strength and power adaptations
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Abstract

This study explored the effects of velocity-based training (VBT) on maximal strength and jump height. Sixteen trained males (22.8 ± 4.5 years) completed a countermovement jump test (CMJ), and one repetition maximum (1-RM) assessment on back squat, bench press, strict overhead press, and deadlift, before and after six weeks of resistance training. Participants were assigned to VBT, or percentage-based training (PBT) groups. The VBT group’s load was dictated via real-time velocity monitoring, as opposed to pre-testing 1-RM data (PBT). No significant differences were present between groups for pre-testing data (p > 0.05). Training resulted in significant increases (p < 0.05) in maximal strength for back squat (VBT 9%, PBT 8%), bench press (VBT 8%, PBT 4%), strict overhead press (VBT 6%, PBT 6%), and
deadlift (VBT 6%). Significant increases in CMJ were witnessed for the VBT group only (5%). A significant interaction effect was witnessed between training groups for bench press (p = 0.004) and CMJ (p = 0.018). Furthermore, for back squat (9%), bench press (6%), and strict overhead press (6%), a significant difference was present between the total volume lifted. The VBT intervention induced favorable adaptations in maximal strength and jump height in trained males when compared to a traditional PBT approach. Interestingly the VBT group achieved these positive outcomes despite a significant reduction in total training volume compared to the PBT group. This has potentially positive implications for the management of fatigue during resistance training.

Keywords:resistance training, strength, velocity
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C600 Sports Science
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Sport and Exercise Science
ID Code:35057
Deposited On:22 Mar 2019 15:44

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