Imitation promotes affiliation in infant macaques at risk for impaired social behaviors

Sclafani, Valentina and Paukner, A. and Suomi, S.J. and Ferrari, P.F. (2015) Imitation promotes affiliation in infant macaques at risk for impaired social behaviors. Developmental Science, 18 (4). pp. 614-621. ISSN 1363-755X

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12237

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Imitation promotes affiliation in infant macaques at risk for impaired social behaviors
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Abstract

Parental responsiveness and synchronization during early face-to-face interactions between mother and infant have been theorized to affect a broad spectrum of positive developmental outcomes in social and cognitive infant growth and to facilitate the development of a sense of self in the baby. Here we show that being imitated can significantly affect the behavior of nursery-reared infant monkeys, which are at an increased risk for developing aberrant social behaviors. Infants look longer and lipsmack more at an experimenter both during imitation and after being imitated. These results demonstrate that from early in life imitation might be used as a privileged form of communication by adults to enhance infants' visual engagement and their social communication. Imitation may therefore be useful to counteract the negative effects of early social adversities. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Additional Information:cited By 10
Keywords:analysis of variance, animal, attention, disease model, female, imitation, male, newborn, photostimulation, physiology, rhesus monkey, social behavior, Social Behavior Disorders, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Disease Models, Animal, Imitative Behavior, Macaca mulatta, Photic Stimulation, Social Behavior Disorders
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C820 Developmental Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:34833
Deposited On:12 Apr 2019 09:54

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