Why we should stop measuring performance and well-being

Bal, Matthijs (2019) Why we should stop measuring performance and well-being. Discussion Paper. Researchgate, Lincoln, UK.

Documents
Bal_2019_Stop_Measuring_Performance_and_Wellbeing.pdf
[img]
[Download]
[img] PDF
Bal_2019_Stop_Measuring_Performance_and_Wellbeing.pdf - Whole Document

264kB
Item Type:Paper or Report (Discussion Paper)
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

As Organizational Behavior scholars (or anyone active in work psychology, HRM, or management), we are trained and socialized to take into account two possible outcomes in our research: performance and well-being. This is notable not only in our theoretical models, our reviews and meta-analyses, our choice of variables when collecting data, but also more implicitly in our thinking, personal and professional ideologies, and the ways we reason about our field of research and how we justify and argue our theories as analysts of human behavior in the workplace. On the one hand, it has been argued that the sole purpose of Organizational Behavior (and I use this term loosely, as it easily translates to related disciplines like the ones mentioned above) is to enhance performance of organizations. This is not merely a marginalized perspective but appears in our mainstream and most prestigious journals, such as Journal of Applied Psychology (Dalal, 2005). On the other hand, it is widely acknowledged that our focus on organizational performance is insufficient and that it is also worthwhile to look at well-being of people, and in particular employees while researching workplace behaviors (see e.g., the review from Karina van de Voorde et al., 2012). This dichotomy of performance and well-being has served us quite well, and provided a space to differentiate ourselves from each other in our research purposes, thereby even pretending that we can take a ‘critical’ perspective on our field.

Keywords:Performance, Well-Being, Measurement, Critique, Critical WOP, Workplace dignity
Subjects:N Business and Administrative studies > N200 Management studies
Divisions:Lincoln International Business School
ID Code:34797
Deposited On:19 Feb 2019 12:24

Repository Staff Only: item control page