How does narrative cue children's perspective taking?

Ziegler, Fenja and Mitchell, P. and Currie, G. (2005) How does narrative cue children's perspective taking? Developmental Psychology, 41 (1). pp. 115-123. ISSN 0012-1649

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Official URL: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/dev/41/1/115/

Abstract

Three experiments with a total of 120 children between 4 and 9 years of age revealed systematic errors in the recall of deictic terms from a narrative. In some cases, the terms were inconsistent with the perspective of a protagonist. The errors occurred in all age groups and were at the same level whether the protagonist was "good" or "bad" but were less common in a narrative that did not include a protagonist. The pattern of errors suggests that children adopted a perspective within the narrative. Moreover, it seems that whereas the form of the narrative is sufficient to provoke a shift in perspective, children might find it even easier to adopt a perspective when the narrative content is about a protagonist. It thus seems that the form and the content of the narrative (that it is about a person) can combine to give a strong cue to perspective. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Three experiments with a total of 120 children between 4 and 9 years of age revealed systematic errors in the recall of deictic terms from a narrative. In some cases, the terms were inconsistent with the perspective of a protagonist. The errors occurred in all age groups and were at the same level whether the protagonist was "good" or "bad" but were less common in a narrative that did not include a protagonist. The pattern of errors suggests that children adopted a perspective within the narrative. Moreover, it seems that whereas the form of the narrative is sufficient to provoke a shift in perspective, children might find it even easier to adopt a perspective when the narrative content is about a protagonist. It thus seems that the form and the content of the narrative (that it is about a person) can combine to give a strong cue to perspective. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Keywords:false-belief, Mind, Comprehension, Point, view
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C820 Developmental Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:3465
Deposited By: Alison Wilson
Deposited On:20 Oct 2010 15:53
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 08:48

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