Seeing is believing: how participants in different subcultures judge people's credulity

Mitchell, Peter and Souglidou, Marianna and Mills, Laura and Ziegler, Fenja (2007) Seeing is believing: how participants in different subcultures judge people's credulity. European Journal of Social Psychology, 37 (3). pp. 573-585. ISSN 0046-2772

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Seeing is believing: how participants in different subcultures judge people's credulity
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Full text URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.378

Abstract

We presented a scenario in which a protagonist saw an object in Location A but later heard a message saying it was in Location B. Participants judged where the protagonist believed the object was. In one condition, participants had additional information that the message was true. Those from an individualistic subculture tended to judge that the protagonist believed the message when they (the participants) knew it was true but disbelieved the message when they had no additional information. In contrast, participants from a collectivist subculture tended to judge that the protagonist believed the message in both circumstances. The results suggest that culture is related with subtle aspects of understanding the mind and especially how people evaluate messages.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:We presented a scenario in which a protagonist saw an object in Location A but later heard a message saying it was in Location B. Participants judged where the protagonist believed the object was. In one condition, participants had additional information that the message was true. Those from an individualistic subculture tended to judge that the protagonist believed the message when they (the participants) knew it was true but disbelieved the message when they had no additional information. In contrast, participants from a collectivist subculture tended to judge that the protagonist believed the message in both circumstances. The results suggest that culture is related with subtle aspects of understanding the mind and especially how people evaluate messages.
Keywords:false-belief, utterances, knowledge, Children, Trust, self
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C820 Developmental Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:3464
Deposited By: Alison Wilson
Deposited On:20 Oct 2010 16:23
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 08:48

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