Night-time screen-based media device use and adolescents' sleep and health-related quality of life

Mireku, Michael O. and Barker, Mary M. and Mutz, Julian and Dumontheil, Iroise and Thomas, Michael S.C. and Röösli, Martin and Elliott, Paul and Toledano, Mireille B. (2019) Night-time screen-based media device use and adolescents' sleep and health-related quality of life. Environment International, 124 . pp. 66-78. ISSN 0160-4120

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2018.11.069

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Night-time screen-based media device use and adolescents' sleep and health-related quality of life
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Abstract

Objective
The present study investigates the relationship between night-time screen-based media devices (SBMD) use, which refers to use within one hour before sleep, in both light and dark rooms, and sleep outcomes and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among 11 to 12-year-olds.

Methods
We analysed baselined data from a large cohort of 6,616 adolescents from 39 schools in and around London, United Kingdom, participating in the Study of Cognition Adolescents and Mobile Phone (SCAMP). Adolescents self-reported their use of any SBMD (mobile phone, tablet, laptop, television etc.). Sleep variables were derived from self-reported weekday and/or weekend bedtime, sleep onset latency (SOL) and wake time. Sleep quality was assessed using four standardised dimensions from the Swiss Health Survey. HRQoL was estimated using the KIDSCREEN-10 questionnaire.

Results
Over two-thirds (71.5%) of adolescents reported using at least one SBMD at night-time, and about a third (32.2%) reported using mobile phones at night-time in darkness. Night-time mobile phone and television use was associated with higher odds of insufficient sleep duration on weekdays (Odds Ratio, OR= 1.82, 95% Confidence Interval, CI [1.59, 2.07] and OR=1.40, 95% CI [1.23, 1.60], respectively). Adolescents who used mobile phones in a room with light were more likely to have insufficient sleep (OR=1.32, 95% CI [1.10, 1.60]) and later sleep midpoint (OR=1.64, 95% CI [1.37, 1.95]) on weekends compared to non-users. The magnitude of these associations was even stronger for those who used mobile phones in darkness for insufficient sleep duration on weekdays (OR=2.13, 95% CI [1.79, 2.54]) and for later sleep midpoint on weekdays (OR=3.88, 95% CI [3.25, 4.62]) compared to non-users. Night-time use of mobile phones in light was not associated with HRQoL but use in darkness was associated with a lower KIDSCREEN-10 score (β= -1.19, 95% CI [-1.83, -0.56]) compared to no use.

Conclusions
We found consistent associations between night-time SBMD use and poor sleep outcomes and worse HRQoL in adolescents. The magnitude of these associations was stronger when SBMD use occurred in a dark room versus a lit room.

Keywords:screen-based media, mobile phone, television, Children, Sleep, quality of life
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C880 Social Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
B Subjects allied to Medicine > B910 Environmental Health
B Subjects allied to Medicine > B990 Subjects Allied to Medicine not elsewhere classified
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:34378
Deposited On:23 Jan 2019 11:03

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