The enigma of patient centredness, the therapeutic relationship and outcomes of the clinical encounter

Siriwardena, A. Niroshan and Norfolk, Tim (2007) The enigma of patient centredness, the therapeutic relationship and outcomes of the clinical encounter. Quality in Primary Care, 15 (1). pp. 1-4. ISSN 1479-1072

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The enigma of patient centredness, the therapeutic relationship and outcomes of the clinical encounter
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Abstract

The increasingly ubiquitous notion of ‘patient centredness’
often causes confusion; indeed instruction received
on this subject often left trainees with only the vaguest
notion of how it could be put into practice, sometimes
leading to bizarre interpretations of this idea. For
example, one colleague described how he, in an attempt
at ‘real’ patient centredness, had attempted a whole
surgery without saying anything at all for as long as
possible, presumably just nodding and gesticulating to
compensate. Although we readily agree that non-verbal
expression accounts for a considerable content of communication, this is perhaps taking things just too far.
Patient centredness remains a central plank of clinical
learning, teaching and assessment and nowadays is also central of policy development in the health service. But what do we mean by patient centredness? Is it really important? How important is it compared to other aspects of the consultation? Does it make a difference?

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:The increasingly ubiquitous notion of ‘patient centredness’ often causes confusion; indeed instruction received on this subject often left trainees with only the vaguest notion of how it could be put into practice, sometimes leading to bizarre interpretations of this idea. For example, one colleague described how he, in an attempt at ‘real’ patient centredness, had attempted a whole surgery without saying anything at all for as long as possible, presumably just nodding and gesticulating to compensate. Although we readily agree that non-verbal expression accounts for a considerable content of communication, this is perhaps taking things just too far. Patient centredness remains a central plank of clinical learning, teaching and assessment and nowadays is also central of policy development in the health service. But what do we mean by patient centredness? Is it really important? How important is it compared to other aspects of the consultation? Does it make a difference?
Keywords:general practice, Communication, patient experience, primary care, patient centredness
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B990 Subjects Allied to Medicine not elsewhere classified
A Medicine and Dentistry > A300 Clinical Medicine
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:3381
Deposited By: Alison Wilson
Deposited On:28 Sep 2010 19:05
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 08:47

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