Multiple murder: A review.

Gresswell, David M and Hollin, Clive R (1994) Multiple murder: A review. British Journal of Criminology . ISSN 1464-3529

Full content URL: https://academic.oup.com/bjc/article/34/1/1/363403

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Abstract

The three major forms of multiple murder are mass murder, which involves multiple murders in the same general area over a short period by a lone assassin; spree murder, which involves multiple murders over a period of hours or days in different locations by an impulsive killer; and serial murder, which involves stranger-to-stranger murders of more than two people in different locations with a significant time lapse between the murders. The serial killer should be described in terms of geographical mobility (stable or unstable) and then assigned to one of four types according to predominate motive. The motives may be "visionary" (hallucinations or delusional beliefs), "Missionary" (rid society of a particular group of people), "hedonistic" (gain psychological or physical security), and "power and control" (life and death control over the victims). Statistics show that there were 52 incidents of multiple murders (three or more victims attributed to a killer or group of killers) recorded between 1982 and 1991. These offenses involved 58 perpetrators and 196 victims, some of whom were killed before 1982. The profile of a multiple murderer is a male less than 35 years old who has not achieved proper socialization. He is likely to have a well rehearsed set of violent, sadistic fantasies that are used to escape the aversive realities of daily life. The potential multiple murderer has a self-maintaining set of beliefs that legitimize and normalize the use of violence and sadism. Suggestions for future research are offered

Additional Information:The final published version of this article can be accessed online at https://academic.oup.com/bjc/article/34/1/1/363403
Keywords:Forensic Psychology, Murder
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C840 Clinical Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:33454
Deposited On:18 Oct 2018 13:07

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