Here, ‘I’ am

O'Neill, Mary (2008) Here, ‘I’ am. Journal of Writing in Creative Practice, 1 (3). pp. 293-300. ISSN 1753-5190

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Full text URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1386/jwcp.1.3.293_1

Abstract

In this paper I will discuss three communicative acts: an ephemeral artwork InMemory; a narrative ‘The art of being lost’; and a paper ‘Ephemeral Art: Mourning and Loss’. These were presented, respectively, at the Salina Art Centre, Kansas; Emotional Geography Conference, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario; and (Im)permanence: Cultures In/Out of Time at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh. These pieces deal with the same subject, but are presented in different modes reflecting the requirements of different sites – a gallery, a conference, and a book. All three aspired to creativity as well as rigour, to articulate intuitive as well as empirical knowledge. I will discuss these works in terms of site specificity and integrated practice, rather than opposite poles of a creative spectrum, which places text at one end and image at the other. I will demonstrate how each mode has informed the other and how each has benefited from the particular requirement imposed by the ‘site’. The site here is not just the physical location but includes the anticipated audience, the environment, and the atmosphere. The works are interactive and are akin to the concept in communication analysis of ‘recipient design’. I hope this case study may be useful in providing an alternative to viewing writing in art and design as inherently problematic. Instead, I offer an analysis of a multifaceted practice in which the ‘I’ is always present, implicitly or explicitly.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:In this paper I will discuss three communicative acts: an ephemeral artwork InMemory; a narrative ‘The art of being lost’; and a paper ‘Ephemeral Art: Mourning and Loss’. These were presented, respectively, at the Salina Art Centre, Kansas; Emotional Geography Conference, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario; and (Im)permanence: Cultures In/Out of Time at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh. These pieces deal with the same subject, but are presented in different modes reflecting the requirements of different sites – a gallery, a conference, and a book. All three aspired to creativity as well as rigour, to articulate intuitive as well as empirical knowledge. I will discuss these works in terms of site specificity and integrated practice, rather than opposite poles of a creative spectrum, which places text at one end and image at the other. I will demonstrate how each mode has informed the other and how each has benefited from the particular requirement imposed by the ‘site’. The site here is not just the physical location but includes the anticipated audience, the environment, and the atmosphere. The works are interactive and are akin to the concept in communication analysis of ‘recipient design’. I hope this case study may be useful in providing an alternative to viewing writing in art and design as inherently problematic. Instead, I offer an analysis of a multifaceted practice in which the ‘I’ is always present, implicitly or explicitly.
Keywords:Art Education, Site specific, Recipient Design, Interactive Writing, Reflexive practice, bmjoaj
Subjects:W Creative Arts and Design > W100 Fine Art
X Education > X342 Academic studies in Higher Education
X Education > X142 Training Teachers - Higher Education
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Art & Design
ID Code:3296
Deposited By: Mary O'Neill
Deposited On:25 Sep 2010 19:21
Last Modified:12 Oct 2012 07:25

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