Can big data solve a big problem? Reporting the obesity data landscape in line with the Foresight obesity system map

Morris, Michelle A and Wilkins, Emma and Timmins, Kate and Bryant, Maria and Birkin, Mark and Griffiths, Claire (2018) Can big data solve a big problem? Reporting the obesity data landscape in line with the Foresight obesity system map. International Journal of Obesity . ISSN 0307-0565

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Can big data solve a big problem? Reporting the obesity data landscape in line with the Foresight obesity system map
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Abstract

Background:

Obesity research at a population level is multifaceted and complex. This has been characterised in the UK by the Foresight obesity systems map, identifying over 100 variables, across seven domain areas which are thought to influence energy balance, and subsequent obesity. Availability of data to consider the whole obesity system is traditionally lacking. However, in an era of big data, new possibilities are emerging. Understanding what data are available can be the first challenge, followed by an inconsistency in data reporting to enable adequate use in the obesity context. In this study we map data sources against the Foresight obesity system map domains and nodes and develop a framework to report big data for obesity research. Opportunities and challenges associated with this new data approach to whole systems obesity research are discussed.

Methods:

Expert opinion from the ESRC Strategic Network for Obesity was harnessed in order to develop a data source reporting framework for obesity research. The framework was then tested on a range of data sources. In order to assess availability of data sources relevant to obesity research, a data mapping exercise against the Foresight obesity systems map domains and nodes was carried out.

Results:

A reporting framework was developed to recommend the reporting of key information in line with these headings: Background; Elements; Exemplars; Content; Ownership; Aggregation; Sharing; Temporality (BEE-COAST). The new BEE-COAST framework was successfully applied to eight exemplar data sources from the UK. 80% coverage of the Foresight obesity systems map is possible using a wide range of big data sources. The remaining 20% were primarily biological measurements often captured by more traditional laboratory based research.

Conclusions:

Big data offer great potential across many domains of obesity research and need to be leveraged in conjunction with traditional data for societal benefit and health promotion.

Keywords:Big Data, Obesity
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B900 Others in Subjects allied to Medicine
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Sport and Exercise Science
ID Code:32803
Deposited On:26 Nov 2018 11:37

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