On the selective deposition of tin and tin oxide on various glasses using a high power diode laser

Lawrence, Jonathan and Lubrani, Peter and Li, Lin (2001) On the selective deposition of tin and tin oxide on various glasses using a high power diode laser. Surface and Coatings Technology, 137 (2-3). pp. 235-240. ISSN 0257-8972

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0257-8972(00)01099-9

Abstract

The deposition of SnO2 using a 120 W high power diode laser (HPDL) on both fused silica and soda-lime-silica glass has been successfully demonstrated. Deposition on both glass substrates was carried out with laser power densities of 650-1600 W cm-2 and at rates of 420-1550 mm min-1. The thickness of the deposited layers was typically around 250 m. The maximum theoretical coverage rate that it may be possible to achieve using the HPDL was calculated as being 3.72 m2 h-1. Owing to the wettability characteristics of Sn, it proved impossible to deposit the metal on either glass substrate. Evidence of solidified microstructures was observed, with the microstructures differing considerably across the same deposited track. These differences were attributed to variations in the solidification rate, R, and the thermal gradient, G. Adhesion of the SnO2 with the soda-lime-silica glass was found to be due to mechanical bonding. The adhesion of the SnO2 with the fused silica was seen to the result of a chemical bond arising from an interface region between the SnO2 and the fused silica glass substrate. This interface region was found to be comprised of mainly Si and rich with Sn3O4.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:The deposition of SnO2 using a 120 W high power diode laser (HPDL) on both fused silica and soda-lime-silica glass has been successfully demonstrated. Deposition on both glass substrates was carried out with laser power densities of 650-1600 W cm-2 and at rates of 420-1550 mm min-1. The thickness of the deposited layers was typically around 250 m. The maximum theoretical coverage rate that it may be possible to achieve using the HPDL was calculated as being 3.72 m2 h-1. Owing to the wettability characteristics of Sn, it proved impossible to deposit the metal on either glass substrate. Evidence of solidified microstructures was observed, with the microstructures differing considerably across the same deposited track. These differences were attributed to variations in the solidification rate, R, and the thermal gradient, G. Adhesion of the SnO2 with the soda-lime-silica glass was found to be due to mechanical bonding. The adhesion of the SnO2 with the fused silica was seen to the result of a chemical bond arising from an interface region between the SnO2 and the fused silica glass substrate. This interface region was found to be comprised of mainly Si and rich with Sn3O4.
Keywords:high power diode laser (HPDL), deposition, adhesion, glass, silica, tin, tin oxide
Subjects:H Engineering > H680 Optoelectronic Engineering
H Engineering > H700 Production and Manufacturing Engineering
Divisions:College of Science > School of Engineering
ID Code:3249
Deposited By:INVALID USER
Deposited On:27 Aug 2010 09:26
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 08:45

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