Consequences of prenatal geophagy for maternal prenatal health, risk of childhood geophagy and child psychomotor development

Mireku, Michael O. and Davidson, Leslie L. and Zoumenou, Romeo and Massougbodji, Achille and Cot, Michel and Bodeau-Livinec, Florence (2018) Consequences of prenatal geophagy for maternal prenatal health, risk of childhood geophagy and child psychomotor development. Tropical Medicine & International Health . ISSN 1360-2276

Full content URL: http://doi.org/10.1111/tmi.13088

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Abstract

Objective To investigate the relationship between prenatal geophagy, maternal prenatal
haematological indices, malaria, helminth infections and cognitive and motor development among
offspring.

Methods: At least a year after delivery, 552 of 863 HIV-negative mothers with singleton births who
completed a clinical trial comparing the efficacy of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and mefloquine during
pregnancy in Allada, Benin, responded to a nutrition questionnaire including their geophagous habits
during pregnancy. During the clinical trial, helminth infection, malaria, haemoglobin and ferritin
3 concentrations were assessed at 1st and 2nd antenatal care visits (ANV) and at delivery. After the
first ANV, women were administered daily iron and folic acid supplements until three months postdelivery.
Singleton children were assessed for cognitive function at age 1 year using the Mullen Scales
of Early Learning.

Results: The prevalence of geophagy during pregnancy was 31.9%. Pregnant women reporting
geophagy were more likely to be anaemic (AOR = 1.9, 95% CI [1.1, 3.4]) at their first ANV if they
reported geophagy at the first trimester. Overall, prenatal geophagy was not associated with maternal
haematological indices, malaria or helminth infections, but geophagy during the third trimester and
throughout pregnancy was associated with poor motor function (AOR = -3.8, 95% CI [-6.9,
-0.6]) and increased odds of geophagous behaviour in early childhood, respectively.

Conclusions: Prenatal geophagy is not associated with haematological indices in the presence of
micronutrient supplementation. However, it may be associated with poor child motor function and
infant geophagy. Geophagy should be screened early in pregnancy.

Keywords:child development, pica, Pregnancy, Anemia
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C850 Cognitive Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C820 Developmental Psychology
B Subjects allied to Medicine > B400 Nutrition
B Subjects allied to Medicine > B990 Subjects Allied to Medicine not elsewhere classified
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:32483
Deposited On:25 Jun 2018 12:56

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