Where the Standard Approach in Comparative Neuroscience Fails and Where It Works: General Intelligence and Brain Asymmetries

Serpico, Davide and Frasnelli, Elisa (2018) Where the Standard Approach in Comparative Neuroscience Fails and Where It Works: General Intelligence and Brain Asymmetries. Comparative Cognition and Behavior Reviews . ISSN 1911-4745

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Where the Standard Approach in Comparative Neuroscience Fails and Where It Works: General Intelligence and Brain Asymmetries
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Abstract

Although brain size and the concept of intelligence have been extensively used in comparative neuroscience to study cognition and its evolution, such coarse-grained traits may not be informative enough about important aspects of neurocognitive systems. By taking into account the different evolutionary trajectories and the selection pressures on neurophysiology across species, Logan and colleagues suggest that the cognitive abilities of an organism should be investigated by considering the fine-grained and species-specific phenotypic traits that characterize it. In such a way, we would avoid adopting human-oriented, coarse-grained traits, typical of the standard approach in cognitive neuroscience. We argue that this standard approach can fail in some cases, but can, however, work in others, by discussing two major topics in contemporary neuroscience as examples: general intelligence and brain asymmetries.

Keywords:General intelligence, brain asymmetries, comparative neuroscience
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C850 Cognitive Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C100 Biology
V Historical and Philosophical studies > V550 Philosophy of Science
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:32303
Deposited On:26 Jun 2018 21:26

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