The effect of bovine colostrum supplementation on intestinal injury and circulating intestinal bacterial DNA following exercise in the heat

March, Daniel and Jones, Arwel and Thatcher, Rhys and Davison, Glen (2018) The effect of bovine colostrum supplementation on intestinal injury and circulating intestinal bacterial DNA following exercise in the heat. European Journal of Nutrition . ISSN 1436-6207

Full content URL: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-018-1670-9

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Abstract

Purpose
Exercise-induced changes in intestinal permeability are exacerbated in the heat. The aim of this study was to
determine the effect of 14 days of bovine colostrum (Col) supplementation on intestinal cell damage (plasma intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, I-FABP) and bacterial translocation (plasma bacterial DNA) following exercise in the heat.
Methods
In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design, 12 males completed two experimental arms (14 days of 20 g/day supplementation with Col or placebo, Plac) consisting of 60 min treadmill running at 70% maximal aerobic capacity (30 °C, 60% relative humidity). Blood samples were collected pre-exercise (Pre-Ex), post-exercise (Post-Ex) and 1 h post-exercise (1 h Post-Ex) to determine plasma I-FABP concentration, and bacterial DNA (for an abundant gut species, Bacteroides).
Results
Two-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed an arm × time interaction for I-FABP (P = 0.005, with greater Post-
Ex increase in Plac than Col, P = 0.01: Plac 407 ± 194% of Pre-Ex vs Col, 311 ± 134%) and 1 h Post-Ex (P = 0.036: Plac
265 ± 80% of Pre-Ex vs Col, 229 ± 56%). There was no interaction (P = 0.904) but there was a main effect of arm (P = 0.046) for plasma Bacteroides/total bacterial DNA, with lower overall levels evident in Col.
Conclusion
This is the first investigation to demonstrate that Col can be effective at reducing intestinal injury following
exercise in the heat, but exercise responses (temporal pattern) of bacterial DNA were not influenced by Col (although overall levels may be lower).

Keywords:Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, Cellular injury, Strenuous exercise, Bacterial translocation, Intestinal permeability, Core temperature, Environment
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C600 Sports Science
C Biological Sciences > C550 Immunology
B Subjects allied to Medicine > B400 Nutrition
B Subjects allied to Medicine > B120 Physiology
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln Institute of Health
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ID Code:31460
Deposited On:05 Apr 2018 09:38

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