Impact of demand side response on a commercial retail refrigeration system

Saleh, Ibrahim and Postnikov, Andrey and Arsene, Corneliu and Zolotas, Argyrios and Bingham, Chris and Bickerton, Ronald and Pearson, Simon (2018) Impact of demand side response on a commercial retail refrigeration system. Energies, 11 (2). p. 371. ISSN 1996-1073

Full content URL: http://doi.org/10.3390/en11020371

Documents
Impact of Demand Side Response on a Commercial Retail Refrigeration System
pdf
[img]
[Download]
[img]
Preview
PDF
energies-11-00371.pdf - Whole Document
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International.

9MB
Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

The UK National Grid has placed increased emphasis on the development of Demand Side Response (DSR) tariff mechanisms to manage load at peak times. Refrigeration systems, along with HVAC, are estimated to consume 14% of the UK’s electricity and could have a significant role for DSR application. However, characterized by relatively low individual electrical loads and massive asset numbers, multiple low power refrigerators need aggregation for inclusion in these tariffs. In this paper, the impact of the Demand Side Response (DSR) control mechanisms on food retailing refrigeration systems is investigated. The experiments are conducted in a test-rig built to resemble a typical small supermarket store. The paper demonstrates how the temperature and pressure profiles of the system, the active power and the drawn current of the compressors are affected following a rapid shut down and subsequent return to normal operation as a response to a DSR event. Moreover, risks and challenges associated with primary and secondary Firm Frequency Response (FFR) mechanisms, where the load is rapidly shed at high speed in response to changes in grid frequency, is considered. For instance, measurements are included that show a significant increase in peak inrush currents of approx. 30% when the system returns to normal operation at the end of a DSR event. Consideration of how high inrush currents after a DSR event can produce voltage fluctuations of the supply and we assess risks to the local power supply system.

Keywords:Demand Side Response, Firm Frequency Response, National Grid, Retail Refrigeration Systems, Inrush current
Subjects:H Engineering > H600 Electronic and Electrical Engineering
H Engineering > H661 Instrumentation Control
H Engineering > H311 Thermodynamics
H Engineering > H660 Control Systems
H Engineering > H620 Electrical Engineering
H Engineering > H100 General Engineering
H Engineering > H360 Electromechanical Engineering
J Technologies > J910 Energy Technologies
H Engineering > H800 Chemical, Process and Energy Engineering
Divisions:College of Science > School of Engineering
ID Code:31137
Deposited On:18 Feb 2018 19:41

Repository Staff Only: item control page