It’s not how old you are, it’s where you’re at in life: application of a life-span framework to physical activity in examining community and environmental interventions

Keegan, Richard and Biddle, Stuart and Lavallee, David (2010) It’s not how old you are, it’s where you’re at in life: application of a life-span framework to physical activity in examining community and environmental interventions. Sport and Exercise Psychology Review, 6 (1). pp. 19-34. ISSN 1745-4980

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It’s not how old you are, it’s where you’re at in life: application of a life-span framework to physical activity in examining community and environmental interventions
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Abstract

Increasing levels of sedentary behaviour and decreasing levels of physical activity have been cited as causes of
rising obesity rates and pose a significant public health risk. The purpose of this ideas paper is to propose a model
of lifespan development that is both relevant and beneficial to the study and promotion of physical activity for health. The proposed model is used in the examination of various community and environmental interventions for the promotion of physical activity. Following the explanation of the physical activity lifespan development model, the framework is used to assess which interventions are most likely to be beneficial to each of three age groups: childhood/early youth, adulthood, and older adulthood. A sample of existing research is then overviewed for each suggested intervention, using a modified RE-AIM framework (Estabrooks & Gyurcsik, 2003). It is concluded that the lifespan development model may be helpful in assessing which physical activity interventions are best suited to various life phases, and also in designing future interventions. Future research
considering interventions as a function of life-phase is recommended and the current model of lifespan development is proposed as a useful tool in the creation and examination of physical activity interventions.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Increasing levels of sedentary behaviour and decreasing levels of physical activity have been cited as causes of rising obesity rates and pose a significant public health risk. The purpose of this ideas paper is to propose a model of lifespan development that is both relevant and beneficial to the study and promotion of physical activity for health. The proposed model is used in the examination of various community and environmental interventions for the promotion of physical activity. Following the explanation of the physical activity lifespan development model, the framework is used to assess which interventions are most likely to be beneficial to each of three age groups: childhood/early youth, adulthood, and older adulthood. A sample of existing research is then overviewed for each suggested intervention, using a modified RE-AIM framework (Estabrooks & Gyurcsik, 2003). It is concluded that the lifespan development model may be helpful in assessing which physical activity interventions are best suited to various life phases, and also in designing future interventions. Future research considering interventions as a function of life-phase is recommended and the current model of lifespan development is proposed as a useful tool in the creation and examination of physical activity interventions.
Keywords:Public health: Preventative medicine, physical activity, lifespan, intervention, health, model
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C600 Sports Science
C Biological Sciences > C880 Social Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C841 Health Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C810 Applied Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Sport and Exercise Science
ID Code:2992
Deposited By:INVALID USER
Deposited On:22 Jul 2010 08:12
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 08:42

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