Alternative public spaces for Black arts in the UK: challenges and prospects

Ogunyemi, Ola (2009) Alternative public spaces for Black arts in the UK: challenges and prospects. International Journal of Africana Studies, 15 (2). pp. 83-109. ISSN 1056-8689

Documents
Alternative_Public_Space_for_BME_Arts.pdf
[img]
[Download]
Request a copy
Alternative_Public_Spaces_for_Black_Arts_in_the_UK.pdf
Alternative version supplied by author
[img]
[Download]
Request a copy
Alternative Public Spaces for Black Arts published.pdf
[img]
[Download]
Request a copy
[img] PDF
Alternative_Public_Space_for_BME_Arts.pdf - Whole Document
Restricted to Repository staff only

103kB
[img] PDF
Alternative_Public_Spaces_for_Black_Arts_in_the_UK.pdf - Whole Document
Restricted to Repository staff only

116kB
[img] PDF
Alternative Public Spaces for Black Arts published.pdf - Whole Document
Restricted to Repository staff only

8MB

Abstract

The Black arts organisations play a vital role in displaying and perpetuating artistic forms that are distinctive to the culture of Black Minority Ethnic groups (BMEs) in the UK. The hub of this socio-cultural existence is concentrated in the cosmopolitan cities such as London, Birmingham, Liverpool and Manchester. However, we have little understanding of their range of artistic forms and of how they exploit cultural opportunities and productivity. Consequently, I explored these issues through ethnographic interviews of two representatives of Black arts organisaitons, ‘The Drum’ and ‘Ewajo - Come and Dance’, and conducted a comparative analysis of their website features. The study found that the Black arts organisations are vibrant in promoting artsform in both shared and self-contained spaces. However, they face a number of challenges including limited contribution to the formulation of cultural policy, location in socio-economically deprived areas, bad publicity, racial prejudice, limited contribution to arts education, and funding. Finally, they gather little personal information about audiences’ taste and interest to enhance the quality of the artsform and performance for the purpose of increasing audience attendance and participation.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:art attendance, art funding, cultural policy, black minority ethnics, BME art sector, art education, Journalism and diaspora, Black press, Diasporic media
Subjects:P Mass Communications and Documentation > P500 Journalism
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Journalism
ID Code:2981
Deposited By: Ola Ogunyemi
Deposited On:22 Jul 2010 20:22
Last Modified:04 Dec 2013 14:06

Repository Staff Only: item control page