Effects of beta-alanine supplementation on brain homocarnosine / carnosine signal and cognitive function: an exploratory study

Yazigi Solis, Marina and Cooper, Simon and Hobson, Ruth M. and Artiolo, Guilherme G. and Otaduy, Maria C. and Roschel, Hamilton and Robertson, Jacques and Martin, Daniel and Painelli, Vitor S. and Harris, Roger C. and Gualano, Bruce and Dale, Craig (2015) Effects of beta-alanine supplementation on brain homocarnosine / carnosine signal and cognitive function: an exploratory study. PLoS ONE, 10 (4). e0123857. ISSN 1932-6203

Full content URL: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.137...

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Abstract

Objectives
Two independent studies were conducted to examine the effects of 28 d of beta-alanine
supplementation at 6.4 g d-1 on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in omnivores and
vegetarians (Study 1) and on cognitive function before and after exercise in trained cyclists
(Study 2).
Methods
In Study 1, seven healthy vegetarians (3 women and 4 men) and seven age- and sexmatched
omnivores undertook a brain 1H-MRS exam at baseline and after beta-alanine
supplementation. In study 2, nineteen trained male cyclists completed four 20-Km cycling
time trials (two pre supplementation and two post supplementation), with a battery of cognitive
function tests (Stroop test, Sternberg paradigm, Rapid Visual Information Processing
task) being performed before and after exercise on each occasion.
Results
In Study 1, there were no within-group effects of beta-alanine supplementation on brain
homocarnosine/carnosine signal in either vegetarians (p = 0.99) or omnivores (p = 0.27);
nor was there any effect when data from both groups were pooled (p = 0.19). Similarly,
there was no group by time interaction for brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal (p = 0.27).
In study 2, exercise improved cognitive function across all tests (P<0.05), although there
was no effect (P>0.05) of beta-alanine supplementation on response times or accuracy for
the Stroop test, Sternberg paradigm or RVIP task at rest or after exercise.
Conclusion
28 d of beta-alanine supplementation at 6.4g d-1 appeared not to influence brain homocarnosine/carnosine
signal in either omnivores or vegetarians; nor did it influence cognitive
function before or after exercise in trained cyclists.

Keywords:beta-alanine, cognitive function, exercise
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C600 Sports Science
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Sport and Exercise Science
ID Code:29806
Deposited On:29 Nov 2017 14:44

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