Identifying personality from the static, nonexpressive face in humans and chimpanzees: evidence of a shared system for signaling personality

Kramer, R. S. S. and King, J. E. and Ward, R. (2011) Identifying personality from the static, nonexpressive face in humans and chimpanzees: evidence of a shared system for signaling personality. Evolution and Human Behavior, 32 (3). pp. 179-185. ISSN 1090-5138

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Abstract

Many aspects of personality are honestly signaled on the human face, as shown by accurate identification of personality traits from static images of unknown faces with neutral expressions. Here, we examined the evolutionary history of this signal system. In four studies, we found that untrained human observers reliably discriminated characteristics related to extraversion solely from nonexpressive facial images of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). In chimpanzees, as in humans, there is therefore information in the static, nonexpressive face that signals aspects of an individual's personality. We suggest that this performance is best explained by shared personality structure and signaling in the two species.

Keywords:Signaling, Faces, Personality, Chimpanzees
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C182 Evolution
C Biological Sciences > C830 Experimental Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
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ID Code:29122
Deposited On:13 Dec 2017 19:49

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