Effect of dietary supplements of apple pectin, wheat bran or fat on the enzyme activity of the human faecal flora

Mallett, A. K. and Rowland, I. R. and Bearne, C. A. and Flynn, John and Fehilly, B. J. and Udeen, S. and Farthing, M. J. G. (1988) Effect of dietary supplements of apple pectin, wheat bran or fat on the enzyme activity of the human faecal flora. Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease, 1 (1). pp. 23-29. ISSN 0891-060x

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/08910608809140175

Abstract

The effect of dietary manipulation on faecal enzyme activities was studied in six healthy volunteers who consumed a mixed, free choice diet (control) or that diet with additional apple pectin (18 g/day), wheat bran (30 g/day) or fat (total greater than 150 g/day) for periods of up to 3 weeks. Control and test diets were alternated over a continuous period of 5 months. Food consumption was recorded and showed that in control periods each subject maintained a high fat (approximately 40 per cent of daily calories) and moderate plant fibre (approximately 18 g/day) intake. Pectin and bran decreased faecal bacterial β-glucosidase and β-glucuronidase activities, and pectin increased the stool concentration and rate of formation of ammonia by faecal incubations in vitro, but fat supplementation was without consistent effect. The results demonstrate that plant cell-wall components, but not dietary fat, significantly influenced the enzymic activity of the faecal microflora from subjects maintaining a mixed dietary intake typical of the UK.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:The effect of dietary manipulation on faecal enzyme activities was studied in six healthy volunteers who consumed a mixed, free choice diet (control) or that diet with additional apple pectin (18 g/day), wheat bran (30 g/day) or fat (total greater than 150 g/day) for periods of up to 3 weeks. Control and test diets were alternated over a continuous period of 5 months. Food consumption was recorded and showed that in control periods each subject maintained a high fat (approximately 40 per cent of daily calories) and moderate plant fibre (approximately 18 g/day) intake. Pectin and bran decreased faecal bacterial β-glucosidase and β-glucuronidase activities, and pectin increased the stool concentration and rate of formation of ammonia by faecal incubations in vitro, but fat supplementation was without consistent effect. The results demonstrate that plant cell-wall components, but not dietary fat, significantly influenced the enzymic activity of the faecal microflora from subjects maintaining a mixed dietary intake typical of the UK.
Keywords:Fat, Ammonia, β-glucosidase, β-glucuronidase, bran, pectin, gut flora
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C560 Biotechnology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:2892
Deposited By: Rosaline Smith
Deposited On:14 Jul 2010 13:35
Last Modified:24 Sep 2012 14:34

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