Morphological determinants of carrier frequency signal in katydids (Orthoptera): a comparative analysis using biophysical evidence

Montealegre-Z, Fernando and Ogden, Jessica and Jonsson, Thorin and Soulsbury, Carl (2017) Morphological determinants of carrier frequency signal in katydids (Orthoptera): a comparative analysis using biophysical evidence. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 30 (11). pp. 2068-2078. ISSN 1010-061X

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Abstract

Male katydids produce mating calls by stridulation using specialized structures on the forewings. The right wing (RW) bears a scraper connected to a drum-like cell known as the mirror and a left wing (LW) that overlaps the RW and bears a serrated vein on the ventral side, the stridulatory file. Sound is generated with the scraper sweeping across the file, producing vibrations that are amplified by the mirror. Using this sound generator, katydids exploit a range of song carrier frequencies (CF) unsurpassed by any other insect group, with species singing as low as 600 Hz and others as high as 150 kHz. Sound generator size has been shown to scale negatively with CF, but such observations derive from studies based on few species, without phylogenetic control, and/or using only the RW mirror length. We carried out a phylogenetic comparative analysis involving 94 species of katydids to study the relationship between LW and RW components of the sound generator and the CF of the male’s mating call, while taking into account body size and phylogenetic relationships. The results showed that CF negatively scaled with all morphological measures, but was most strongly related to components of the sound generation system (file, LW and RW mirrors). Interestingly, the LW mirror (reduced and non-functional) predicted CF more accurately than the RW mirror, and body size is not a reliable CF predictor. Mathematical models were verified on known species for predicting CF in species for which sound is unknown (e.g. fossils or museum specimens).

Keywords:Stridulation, sound production, insect, Bioacoustics, Fossil, Body size
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C770 Biophysical Science
C Biological Sciences > C182 Evolution
C Biological Sciences > C181 Biodiversity
C Biological Sciences > C340 Entomology
F Physical Sciences > F380 Acoustics
C Biological Sciences > C120 Behavioural Biology
C Biological Sciences > C180 Ecology
C Biological Sciences > C100 Biology
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
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ID Code:28862
Deposited On:04 Oct 2017 14:05

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