The moderating effects of self-esteem and self-efficacy on responses to Graphic Health Warnings on cigarette packages: A comparison of smokers and nonsmokers

Chun, Seungwoo and Park, Joon Woo and Heflick, Nathan and Lee, Seon Min and Kim, Daejin and Kwon, Kyenghee (2017) The moderating effects of self-esteem and self-efficacy on responses to Graphic Health Warnings on cigarette packages: A comparison of smokers and nonsmokers. Health Communication, 33 (8). pp. 1013-1019. ISSN 1041-0236

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Item Type:Article
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Abstract

Do graphic pictorial health warnings (GPHWs) on cigarette packaging work better for some people than others? According to the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM), fear appeals should heighten positive change only if a person believes he or she is capable of change (i.e., self-efficacy). We exposed 242 smokers and 241 nonsmokers (aged 18–29) in the Republic of Korea to either a GPHW or a text-only warning in a between-subjects experiment. Results indicated that the GPHW increased intentions and motivations to quit smoking (for smokers) and intentions and motivations to not start smoking (for nonsmokers). However, these effects were moderated by self-efficacy related to quitting or not starting smoking. For smokers, a GPHW was especially effective in increasing desires and intentions to quit for people high in self-efficacy and high in self-esteem. However, for nonsmokers, a GPHW was effective only when self-efficacy was high, regardless of self-esteem level. For smokers and nonsmokers, results were mediated by heightened perceived health estimation. Implications for understanding the effectiveness of warning labels on cigarettes, for the introduction of GPHWs in the Republic of Korea, and for the Extended Parallel Process Model, are discussed.

Keywords:smoking reduction, Advertising, health warnings
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C880 Social Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
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ID Code:28631
Deposited On:01 Sep 2017 10:14

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