Between space and function: how spatial and functional features determine the comprehension of between

van der Zee, Emile and Watson, Matt (2004) Between space and function: how spatial and functional features determine the comprehension of between. In: Functional Features in Language and Space: insights from perception, categorization and development. Explorations in Language and Space , 2 (2). Oxford University Press, USA , pp. 116-127. ISBN 9780199264322

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Abstract

It is often assumed that the spatial meaning of between is only based on spatial features (geometrically definable cognitive representations; see, e.g. Johnston and
Slobin, 1979). This chapter first considers how spatial features represent the meaning of between. It then considers a possible impact of visual functional
features (visually perceived spatial features, like cartoon-like eyes, that invite a particular object categorization, such as ‘this is an animal’), linguistic functional
features (lexical concepts inviting a particular categorization, as derived from ‘this is a thumb’), general functional features (features contributed by cognitive
processes found across cognitive systems, like cognitive effort), and dynamic–kinematic features (features specifying actual or potential interactions between
physical entities). After considering why between can correspond to more than one spatial prototype it is discussed which of the above features are lexical features,
which features are contextual features, and how features of different types may interact to specify the meaning of between in context.

Item Type:Book Section
Additional Information:It is often assumed that the spatial meaning of between is only based on spatial features (geometrically definable cognitive representations; see, e.g. Johnston and Slobin, 1979). This chapter first considers how spatial features represent the meaning of between. It then considers a possible impact of visual functional features (visually perceived spatial features, like cartoon-like eyes, that invite a particular object categorization, such as ‘this is an animal’), linguistic functional features (lexical concepts inviting a particular categorization, as derived from ‘this is a thumb’), general functional features (features contributed by cognitive processes found across cognitive systems, like cognitive effort), and dynamic–kinematic features (features specifying actual or potential interactions between physical entities). After considering why between can correspond to more than one spatial prototype it is discussed which of the above features are lexical features, which features are contextual features, and how features of different types may interact to specify the meaning of between in context.
Keywords:spatial prototype, lexical features, contextual features, geometrically definable cognitive
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:2563
Deposited By: Rosaline Smith
Deposited On:24 May 2010 16:14
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 08:38

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