The protozoan parasite Trichomonas gallinae causes adult and nestling mortality in a declining population of European turtle doves, Streptopelia turtur

Stockdale, Jennifer E. and Dunn, Jenny C. and Goodman, Simon J. and Sheehan, Antony J. and Sheehan, Danae K. and Grice, Philip V. and Hamer, Keith C. (2015) The protozoan parasite Trichomonas gallinae causes adult and nestling mortality in a declining population of European turtle doves, Streptopelia turtur. Parasitology, 142 (03). pp. 490-498. ISSN 0031-1820

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Item Type:Article
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Abstract

Studies incorporating the ecology of clinical and sub-clinical disease in wild populations of conservation concern are rare. Here we examine sub-clinical infection by Trichomonas gallinae in a declining population of free-living European Turtle Doves and suggest caseous lesions cause mortality in adults and nestlings through subsequent starvation and/or suffocation. We found a 100% infection rate by T. gallinae in adult and nestling Turtle Doves (n = 25) and observed clinical signs in three adults and four nestlings (28%). Adults with clinical signs displayed no differences in any skeletal measures of size but had a mean 3·7% reduction in wing length, with no overlap compared to those without clinical signs.We also identified T. gallinae as the suggested cause of mortality in one Red-legged Partridge although disease presentation was different. A minimum of four strains of T. gallinae, characterized at the ITS/5·8S/ITS2 ribosomal region, were isolated from Turtle Doves. However, all birds with clinical signs (Turtle Doves and the Red-legged Partridge) carried a single strain of T. gallinae, suggesting that parasite spill over between Columbidae and Galliformes is a possibility that should be further investigated. Overall, we highlight the importance of monitoring populations for sub-clinical infection rather than just clinical disease

Keywords:disease, feeding ecology, supplementary food, necropsy, PCR, NotOAChecked
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C180 Ecology
C Biological Sciences > C170 Population Biology
C Biological Sciences > C111 Parasitology
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
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ID Code:25336
Deposited On:20 Dec 2016 15:30

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