Chemical remobilization of contaminant metals within floodplain sediments in an incising river system: implications for dating and chemostratigraphy

Hudson-Edwards, K. A. and Macklin, M. G. and Curtis, C. D. and Vaughan, D. J. (1998) Chemical remobilization of contaminant metals within floodplain sediments in an incising river system: implications for dating and chemostratigraphy. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 23 (8). pp. 671-684. ISSN 0197-9337

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Item Type:Article
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Abstract

Metals such as Pb, Zn, Cd and Cu from historical mining activity have been used as stratigraphic markers for dating and provenancing vertically accreted, fine-grained floodplain overbank deposits. This study presents evidence for chemical remobilization of these metals within overbank sediments in the Tyne basin, UK. The evidence includes: breakdown of metal-bearing minerals (sulphides, carbonates, iron and manganese oxyhydroxides); shifts of chemical fractions within zones of relatively low pH towards more soluble and reactive phases; and accumulation of secondary iron and manganese oxyhydroxides at levels related to fluctuating water-table levels or to the breakdown of organic matter. All of this suggests that fine, centimetre-scale, chemostratigraphy using metal concentrations and ratios is unlikely to provide reliable data in river systems that have experienced, or are experiencing, major changes in water-table levels, or pedogenesis. Coarse tens of centimetre- to metre-scale, chemostratigraphy, when applied with caution, may still provide a means of delineating contaminated units.

Keywords:chemostratigraphy, dating method, heavy metal, mine waste, sediment pollution, England, Tyne Basin, United Kingdom
Subjects:F Physical Sciences > F840 Physical Geography
Divisions:College of Science > School of Geography
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ID Code:25137
Deposited On:26 Nov 2016 16:48

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