Socioeconomic variation in attitudes to eating and weight in female adolescents

Wardle, Jane and Robb, Kathryn A. and Johnson, Fiona and Griffith, Jayne and Power, Chris and Brunner, Eric and Tovee, Martin (2004) Socioeconomic variation in attitudes to eating and weight in female adolescents. Health Psychology, 23 (3). pp. 275-282. ISSN 0278-6133

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Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

This study was stimulated by J. Sobal and A. J. Stunkard's (1989) theory that differences in deliberate weight control could underlie the socioeconomic gradient in adult weight. Female adolescents (N = 1,248) completed measures of socioeconomic status, social norms for weight, weight ideals, attitudes to weight, and weight control behaviors. Higher socioeconomic status adolescents had greater awareness of the social ideals of slimness and had more family and friends who were trying to lose weight. They also defined a lower body mass index as "fat" and were more likely to have used healthy weight control methods. The results support the idea that socioeconomic differences in weight-related attitudes and behaviors may mediate the development of a gradient in weight.

Keywords:Nutrition disorder, Nutritional status, Female, Adolescent, Social environment, Attitude, Risk factor, Family environment, Thin body, Social norm, Social group, Social belonging, Socioeconomic status, Body weight, Body image
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C841 Health Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C880 Social Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C840 Clinical Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:24508
Deposited On:11 Aug 2017 10:12

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