Weight-based discrimination in occupational hiring and helping behavior

Swami, Viren and Chan, Flora and Wong, Vivien and Furnham, Adrian and Tovee, Martin J. (2008) Weight-based discrimination in occupational hiring and helping behavior. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 38 (4). pp. 968-981. ISSN 0021-9029

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Abstract

This study explored weight-based discrimination using a range of weight categories, as represented by images of real women with known body mass index (BMI). In the first study, 30 men rated each image according to likelihood of occupational hiring for a managerial post. In the second study, 28 men rated the same images for likelihood of helping behavior following a minor accident. Study results showed that individuals with a slender body weight (BMI = 19-20) were most likely to be hired and helped, while obese (BMI > 30) participants were least likely to be hired and helped. However, results also showed that emaciated (BMI < 15) individuals were likely to be discriminated against. Implications for real-life settings are discussed.

Keywords:weight discrimination, Body Mass Index, BMI, occupational discrimination, interviewing
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C811 Occupational Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C850 Cognitive Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C880 Social Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C841 Health Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C840 Clinical Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:24437
Deposited On:12 Jul 2017 15:38

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