Implementation of new training programme from one higher education institution (HEI) to another: Investigating barriers and enablers to adoption across a faculty.

Turner, Paul and Mohammed, Judith and Morton, Sean and Roberts, Lorraine (2016) Implementation of new training programme from one higher education institution (HEI) to another: Investigating barriers and enablers to adoption across a faculty. In: NET 2016 Conference, 6th - 8th September 2016, Churchill College, Cambridge.

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Abstract

Since 2001 simulation within the University setting has become a popular method of teaching clinical skills (Dowie and Phillips 2011). Stirling et al (2012) and De Souza et al (2015) both highlight the benefits of simulation skills teaching to student nurses, these include increased confidence, a better understanding of prioritisation and increased communication skills. In addition to the skills teaching that takes place as part of the taught content, the Nursing and Midwifery Council (2010) allow for up to 300 hours of practice time to be undertaken using a simulated clinical environment. This is beneficial in both reducing the strain on overstretched health care placements and in giving the students a chance to practice skills they may not be routinely exposed to in practice.
Despite such national interest and the stated benefits to both students and services the nursing teaching staff have had less exposure and involvement in simulated learning environments. To counter this level of exposure, an innovative and successful training package for nursing has been offered by the University of Huddersfield. Evidence exists that a simple transfer of service or educational development in one arena may not readily translate into fidelity of implementation in another (Carroll et al 20007).
Effective and efficient clinical simulation is now a high priority in the current and future nurse curriculum at Lincoln (and elsewhere) (Willis Review 2015). The need to understand how nursing might adopt and retain fidelity to the aims and practices of clinical simulation is an important aspect of implementation of the Huddersfield programme. This study will seek to understand the barriers and enablers of simulation during the initial roll-out.

Aim: The aim of the research is to identify the issues that facilitate and/or inhibit the adoption of a clinical teaching simulation training package in order to support future teaching development.
Objectives
• To obtain a set of baseline measures on confidence, interest and capability in teaching clinical skills using simulation.
• To provide information for a future project to provide and evaluate the support identified by the lecturers

Keywords:Simulation, Lecture concerns, Training needs
Subjects:X Education > X342 Academic studies in Higher Education
X Education > X900 Others in Education
B Subjects allied to Medicine > B790 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
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ID Code:24037
Deposited On:09 Sep 2016 11:02

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