The sentimental satire of Sophia Baddeley

Culley, Amy (2008) The sentimental satire of Sophia Baddeley. Studies in English Literature 1500-1900, 48 (3). pp. 677-692. ISSN 0039-3657

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Full text URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/sel.0.0017

Abstract

The article explores the literary significance of Elizabeth Steele’s The Memoirs of Mrs. Sophia Baddeley (1787) and considers the relationship between satire and sentiment in the self-representations of late eighteenth-century courtesans. The Memoirs establishes the courtesan Sophia Baddeley as a sentimental heroine and translates her experience of domestic violence and sexual double standards into a satire of fashionable society. Elizabeth Steele’s narrative therefore anticipates the sentimental self-portraits of nineteenth-century women writers and looks back to an earlier tradition of the referential scandal chronicle. In addition, it reveals the impact of the commercial exchanges of the literary marketplace on female self-representations.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:The Memoirs of Mrs. Sophia Baddeley, eighteenth-century courtesans, satire, sentiment, Eighteenth-century actresses, Scandalous memoir
Subjects:Q Linguistics, Classics and related subjects > Q321 English Literature by period
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Humanities
ID Code:2378
Deposited By: Amy Culley
Deposited On:28 Sep 2012 12:00
Last Modified:05 Dec 2013 10:24

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