Feeding Lincoln: multiple benefits from considering food as a local system

Curry, Nigel and Allen-Collinson, Jacquelyn and Markham, Claire (2016) Feeding Lincoln: multiple benefits from considering food as a local system. Project Report. HART, University of Lincoln.

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Abstract

Introduction

Over the last fifteen years or so there has been a huge growth in interest in local food in cities and towns throughout the western world (Renting et al, 2012). This interest is illustrated in case studies throughout this document. Two major concerns have been at the forefront of this local food movement. Threats to global food security are a concern for many and have been highlighted in a number of international reports . These include fossil fuel dependence and fuel shortages (it takes 10 calories of energy to produce one calorie of food, Lott (2011)); crop failures; intensive animal production; soil erosion; land use change; climate change; resource depletion (including water); population growth; price volatilities; extreme weather and civil unrest, for example.

Food system waste is a particularly pressing issue within this global food security agenda, because it requires solutions that are almost entirely local. Globally, the issue is huge: there is enough food waste going into landfill to feed a billion people. There is more food wasted in the northern hemisphere than is consumed in the sub-Saharan world. A third of all food produced is lost or wasted each year (50% of the world’s fruit and vegetable production). This is equivalent to 1% of all global output (UN Food and Agriculture Organisation, 2016a). It wastes resources and contributes significantly to global warming.

Keywords:food supply chain, Food, Healthy food, Food strategy, Short food chain, Food waste, Sustainability, Food system, Food security
Subjects:L Social studies > L300 Sociology
D Veterinary Sciences, Agriculture and related subjects > D690 Food studies not elsewhere classified
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Sport and Exercise Science
ID Code:23505
Deposited On:14 Jul 2016 13:28

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