'I didn't think I had it, but I'm glad I found out': supporting the learning needs and the assessment of practice of students diagnosed with dyslexia

Saunders, Heather and Hunt, Rachael and Mathews, Ian and Simpson, Diane (2016) 'I didn't think I had it, but I'm glad I found out': supporting the learning needs and the assessment of practice of students diagnosed with dyslexia. In: International Practice Teaching and Field education conference, 4-6 April 2016, Belfast.

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Item Type:Conference or Workshop contribution (Presentation)
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Abstract

There is significant anecdotal and research evidence to suggest that students attracted to professional qualifying courses and careers in the ‘caring professions’ have an increased likelihood of being diagnosed as having dyslexia, compared to the general population. The reasons for this are contested, although it is argued that students with dyslexia perform less well at school and are implicitly, or even explicitly, encouraged to consider ‘working with people.’ This paper discusses how the School of Health and Social Care at the University of Lincoln has developed a range of support mechanisms to respond to the needs of students with dyslexia, who are consistently over represented on their social work and nursing courses. It additionally explores how it supports practitioners responsible for the assessment of students with dyslexia on practice placement. In particular discrete ‘dyslexia guides’ have been produced for the benefit of students with dyslexia, and to inform practice assessors about the needs of students with dyslexia. The guides incorporate information about key topics such as reasonable adjustments, memory and processing issues, communication needs, motor skills and coordination, as well as signposting to other sources of information and support. Additionally, the School has developed and introduced a highly regarded workshop on the needs of students with dyslexia for practitioners responsible for the assessment of students on placement. This paper will contextualise the support provided by the School of Health and Social Care, will share areas of good practice, and encourage participants to discuss our evolving understanding of what it means to be diagnosed as ‘dyslexic’ in the caring professions.

Keywords:dyslexia social work
Subjects:L Social studies > L500 Social Work
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
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ID Code:22848
Deposited On:09 Apr 2016 19:18

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