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Re-valorizing rubbish: some critical reflections on ‘green’ product strategies

Maycroft, Neil (2000) Re-valorizing rubbish: some critical reflections on ‘green’ product strategies. Capital & Class Special Issue; Environmental Politics: Analyses and Alternatives, No 72, Autumn 2000., 72 . pp. 135-160. ISSN 0309 8168

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Re-valorizing rubbish: some critical reflections on ‘green’ product strategies
This paper was originally published as ‘Re-valorizing rubbish: some critical reflections on ‘green’ product strategies’, in Capital & Class Special Issue; Environmental Politics: Analyses and Alternatives, No 72, Autumn 2000.
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Item Type:Article
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Abstract

The last twenty years has seen the rise of a series of intellectual and practical responses to environmental degradation. Many socialists and critical theorists have sought to develop sophisticated analyses of ecological despoiling and have aimed to provide the contours of various ‘eco-socialist’ alternatives. These range from visions of small-scale communal autarky through ‘green’ or ‘eco-city’ concepts to global perspectives. Crucially, for most of these ecologically minded socialists, the social relations of capitalism rather than simply the ‘industrial mode of production’ has been the focus of critique. Where many liberal or reactionary environmentalists see the industrial processes of production and the wasteful activities of consumption as driving the planet towards ecological doom, most socialists seek to analyze the ways in which the relational social processes of capital augment, enlarge and exaggerate the ecological harm that results from industrial production and mass consumption.

Additional Information:The last twenty years has seen the rise of a series of intellectual and practical responses to environmental degradation. Many socialists and critical theorists have sought to develop sophisticated analyses of ecological despoiling and have aimed to provide the contours of various ‘eco-socialist’ alternatives. These range from visions of small-scale communal autarky through ‘green’ or ‘eco-city’ concepts to global perspectives. Crucially, for most of these ecologically minded socialists, the social relations of capitalism rather than simply the ‘industrial mode of production’ has been the focus of critique. Where many liberal or reactionary environmentalists see the industrial processes of production and the wasteful activities of consumption as driving the planet towards ecological doom, most socialists seek to analyze the ways in which the relational social processes of capital augment, enlarge and exaggerate the ecological harm that results from industrial production and mass consumption.
Keywords:Green design, Rubbish, Revalorization, Products, Waste, maycroft498
Subjects:W Creative Arts and Design > W200 Design studies
Divisions:College of Arts > School of Architecture & Design > School of Architecture & Design (Design)
ID Code:2064
Deposited On:18 Nov 2009 12:30

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