Barriers and facilitators for people from minority ethnic groups accessing prehospital care: a systematic review

Phung, Viet-Hai and Windle, Karen and Ortega, Marishona and Essam, Nadya and Barot, Mukesh and Kai, Joe and Johnson, Mark and Siriwardena, Niro (2015) Barriers and facilitators for people from minority ethnic groups accessing prehospital care: a systematic review. In: College of Social Science Summer Conference, July 2nd 2015, David Chiddick Building, University of Lincoln.

Documents
College of Social Science BME Systematic Review Poster 2 July 2015.ppt
[img]
[Download]
[img] Microsoft PowerPoint
College of Social Science BME Systematic Review Poster 2 July 2015.ppt - Presentation

326kB
Item Type:Conference or Workshop contribution (Poster)
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Background
Despite its increasing importance, equity remains an unrealised aspiration in healthcare. People from minority ethnic groups are proportionately less likely to access emergency and hospital services than the majority White population, despite higher levels of need. Our systematic literature review and narrative synthesis aimed to identify the barriers or facilitators to accessing ambulance and paramedic care for minority ethnic patients. In doing so, the review explored the causes and consequences of any differences in care delivery.

Methods
We designed a data extraction tool to elicit the required information. Studies were included if they referenced minority ethnic groups, the ambulance service, barriers and facilitators, etc. Included studies also had to be: published in English, from 2003-2013, based in North America, Europe or Australasia. We applied the same combination of search terms across 14 electronic databases.

Results
Barriers to accessing care included: communication difficulties; limited knowledge of the healthcare system and staff cultural stereotyping. There were ethnic disparities in mortality and survival rates, reflecting differences in condition severity, delays in seeking treatment, etc. Such delays were due to limited knowledge of symptoms and previous discriminatory experiences.

Conclusion
Little quality evidence exists on improving minority ethnic access to ambulance and paramedic care, which is compounded by challenges in generalising findings from the US to the UK. The identified barriers may be mitigated by interpreting services and staff cultural competency education. Each requires more robust patient ethnicity and language data. Having identified some of the barriers and facilitators, further qualitative research is needed to explore why they exist. This supplementary research could then inform strategies to provide more equitable prehospital ambulance care for minority ethnic groups.

Additional Information:BMC Health Services Research
Keywords:Minority ethnic groups; paramedic; ambulance; Emergency Medical Services, systematic review.
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B990 Subjects Allied to Medicine not elsewhere classified
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:19519
Deposited On:09 Nov 2015 14:22

Repository Staff Only: item control page