Attending at a low intensity increases impulsivity in an auditory sustained attention to response task

Roebuck, Hettie and Guo, Kun and Bourke, Patrick (2015) Attending at a low intensity increases impulsivity in an auditory sustained attention to response task. Perception, 44 (12). pp. 1371-1382. ISSN 0301-0066

Full content URL: http://pec.sagepub.com/content/44/12/1371.full

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Item Type:Article
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Abstract

Why attention lapses during prolonged tasks is debated, specifically whether errors are a consequence of under-arousal or exerted effort. To explore this, we investigated whether increased impulsivity is associated with effortful processing by modifying the demand of a task by presenting it at a quiet intensity. Here, we consider whether attending at low but detectable levels affects impulsivity in a population with intact hearing. A modification of the Sustained Attention to Response Task was used with auditory stimuli at two levels: the participants’ personal “lowest detectable” level and a “normal speaking” level. At the quiet intensity, we found that more impulsive responses were made compared with listening at a normal speaking level. These errors were not due to a failure in discrimination. The findings suggest an increase in processing time for auditory stimuli at low levels that exceeds the time needed to interrupt a planned habitual motor response. This leads to a more impulsive and erroneous response style. These findings have important implications for understanding the nature of impulsivity in relation to effortful processing. They may explain why a high proportion of individuals with hearing loss are also diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

Keywords:Sustained Attention to Response Task, Auditory attention, Effortful listening, Impulsivity, Sustained attention, NotOAChecked
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:19508
Deposited On:06 Nov 2015 14:19

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