Exploring the feasibility of implementing a supervised exercise training and compression hosiery intervention in patients with venous ulceration: a case study

Tew, Garry and McIntosh, Emma and Kesterton, Sue and Middleton, Geoff and Klonizakis, Markos (2015) Exploring the feasibility of implementing a supervised exercise training and compression hosiery intervention in patients with venous ulceration: a case study. In: Annual BHFNC and NSCEM conference, 22nd September 2015, Loughborough University.

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Exploring the feasibility of implementing a supervised exercise training and compression hosiery intervention in patients with venous ulceration: a case study
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BHF Poster Presentation EM 1.pdf - Whole Document

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Item Type:Conference or Workshop contribution (Poster)
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Study background and context (please read poster for more information)
Over 180,000 people in the UK suffer from venous leg ulcers; it is a major health problem (Whiteley, 2013). A leg ulcer is defined as a break in the skin of the leg which has not healed after 4-6 weeks (Morris & Sander, 2007). Treatment of venous ulcers costs the NHS between £400,000 - £600,000 annually (Whiteley, 2013). Exercise training offers a financially viable adjunct to compression hosiery in the prevention and treatment of venous ulcers, via favourable effects on lower-limb blood flow and vascular function (Davies et al, 2008). Despite the potential benefits, the combined effect of exercise and compression has not yet been examined and the Royal College of Nursing is requesting for more studies to be undertaken in this area.

Additional Information:Conference title: Just Good Medicine - The role of physical activity in the prevention and management of long term conditions Conference title: Just Good Medicine - The role of physical activity in the prevention and management of long term conditions
Keywords:Case study, mixed methods, National Health Service, exercise
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B120 Physiology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Sport and Exercise Science
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ID Code:19475
Deposited On:04 Nov 2015 16:03

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