Saccharomyces eubayanus and Saccharomyces arboricola reside in North Island native New Zealand forests

Gayevskiy, Velimir and Goddard, Matthew R. (2016) Saccharomyces eubayanus and Saccharomyces arboricola reside in North Island native New Zealand forests. Environmental Microbiology, 18 (4). pp. 1137-1147. ISSN 1462-2920

Full content URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1462-29...

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Saccharomyces eubayanus and Saccharomyces arboricola reside in North Island native New Zealand forests
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Abstract

Saccharomyces is one of the best-studied microbial genera but our understanding of the global distributions and evolutionary histories of its members is relatively poor. Recent studies have altered our view of Saccharomyces’ origin, but a lack of sampling from the vast majority of the world precludes a holistic perspective. We evaluate alternate Gondwanan and Far East Asian hypotheses concerning the origin of these yeasts. Being part of Gondwana, and only colonized by humans in the last ~1,000 years, New Zealand represents a unique environment for testing these ideas. Genotyping and ribosomal sequencing of samples from North Island native forest parks identified a widespread population of Saccharomyces. Whole genome sequencing identified the presence of S. arboricola and S. eubayanus in NZ, which is the first report of S. arboricola outside Far East Asia, and also expands S. eubayanus’ known distribution to include the Oceanic region. Phylogenomic approaches place the S. arboricola population as significantly diverged from the only other sequenced Chinese isolate, but indicate that S. eubayanus might be a recent migrant from South America. These data tend to support the Far East Asian origin of the Saccharomyces, but the history of this group is still far from clear.

Keywords:Yeast, Saccharomyces
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C400 Genetics
C Biological Sciences > C500 Microbiology
C Biological Sciences > C100 Biology
C Biological Sciences > C181 Biodiversity
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:19446
Deposited On:04 Nov 2015 15:11

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