'We are all equals!' Militarism, homogenization and 'egalitarianism' in nationalist state-building (1789-1945)

Conversi, Daniele (2008) 'We are all equals!' Militarism, homogenization and 'egalitarianism' in nationalist state-building (1789-1945). Ethnic and racial studies, 31 (7). pp. 1286-1314. ISSN 0141-9870

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Full text URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01419870701625450

Abstract

Cultural homogenization has accompanied many of the most destructive processes of mass displacement during the Twentieth century. Its goal has been to make polity and citizens ethnically and culturally 'congruent'. This article questions the explanatory power of traditional accounts linking cultural homogenization with industrialization during state-building processes and the emergence of nationalism. It suggests that further attention must be paid to the role of the military as an essential institution in both of these processes. Finally, the 'egalitarian' rhetoric and legitimizing rationale underpinning both militarization and cultural homogenization is assessed as a most powerful nationalist tool for imposing new hierarchical structures

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Cultural homogenization has accompanied many of the most destructive processes of mass displacement during the Twentieth century. Its goal has been to make polity and citizens ethnically and culturally 'congruent'. This article questions the explanatory power of traditional accounts linking cultural homogenization with industrialization during state-building processes and the emergence of nationalism. It suggests that further attention must be paid to the role of the military as an essential institution in both of these processes. Finally, the 'egalitarian' rhetoric and legitimizing rationale underpinning both militarization and cultural homogenization is assessed as a most powerful nationalist tool for imposing new hierarchical structures
Keywords:Theories of nationalism, State-building, Homogenisation, Egalitarianism, Historical sociology, Militarism
Subjects:L Social studies > L160 International Economics
L Social studies > L214 Nationalism
L Social studies > L240 International Politics
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Social & Political Sciences
ID Code:1942
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:16 Jul 2009 08:39
Last Modified:18 Jul 2011 16:21

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