Effects of bovine colostrum supplementation on upper respiratory illness in active males

Jones, Arwel W. and Cameron, Simon J. S. and Thatcher, Rhys and Beecroft, Marikka S. and Mur, Luis A. J. and Davison, Glen (2014) Effects of bovine colostrum supplementation on upper respiratory illness in active males. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 39 . pp. 194-203. ISSN 0889-1591

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Abstract

Bovine colostrum (COL) has been advocated as a nutritional countermeasure to exercise-induced immune dysfunction and increased risk of upper respiratory illness (URI) in athletic populations, however, the mechanisms remain unclear. During winter months, under double-blind procedures, 53 males (mean training load±SD, 50.5±28.9 MET-hweek(-1)) were randomized to daily supplementation of 20g of COL (N=25) or an isoenergetic/isomacronutrient placebo (PLA) (N=28) for 12weeks. Venous blood was collected at baseline and at 12weeks and unstimulated saliva samples at 4 weeks intervals. There was a significantly lower proportion of URI days and number of URI episodes with COL compared to PLA over the 12weeks (p<0.05). There was no effect of COL on in vitro neutrophil oxidative burst, salivary secretory IgA or salivary antimicrobial peptides (p>0.05), which does not support previously suggested mechanisms. In a subset of participants (COL=14, PLA=17), real-time quantitative PCR, targeting the 16S rRNA gene showed there was an increase in salivary bacterial load over the 12 weeks period with PLA (p<0.05) which was not as evident with COL. Discriminant function analysis of outputs received from serum metabolomics showed changes across time but not between groups. This is the first study to demonstrate that COL limits the increased salivary bacterial load in physically active males during the winter months which may provide a novel mechanism of immune-modulation with COL and a relevant marker of in vivo (innate) immunity and risk of URI.

Keywords:16S rRNA, Innate immunity, Metabolomics, Microbiome, Mucosal immunity, URTI, NotOAChecked
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C550 Immunology
C Biological Sciences > C600 Sports Science
B Subjects allied to Medicine > B400 Nutrition
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln Institute of Health
ID Code:19013
Deposited On:16 Oct 2015 09:06

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