Influenza vaccination and risk of stroke: self-controlled case-series study

Asghar, Zahid and Coupland, Carol and Siriwardena, A. Niroshan (2015) Influenza vaccination and risk of stroke: self-controlled case-series study. Vaccine, 33 (41). pp. 5458-5463. ISSN 0264-410X

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Influenza vaccination and risk of stroke: Self-controlled case-series study
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Abstract

Background: Stroke may be triggered by respiratory infections, including influenza. Influenza vaccination could therefore reduce risk of stroke. Previous studies of this association have shown conflicting results.We aimed to investigate whether influenza vaccination was associated with reduced risk of stroke.
Methods: We used a self-controlled case series design. The General Practice Research Database (GPRD) was used to extract records of patients aged 18 years or over recorded with stroke (fatal or non-fatal) from September 2001 to May 2009. Statistical modelling with conditional Poisson regression was employed to compute incidence rate ratios (IRR). The incidence rate of stroke in fixed time periods after influenza vaccination was compared with the incidence rate during a baseline period.
Results: There were 17,853 eligible individuals who received one or more influenza vaccinations and experienced a stroke during the observation period. The incidence of stroke was significantly reduced inthe first 59 days following influenza vaccination compared with the baseline period. We found reductionsof 55% (IRR 0.45; 95% CI 0.36–0.57) in the first 1–3 days after vaccination, 36% (0.64; 0.53–0.76) at 4–7days, 30% (0.70; 0.61–0.79) at 8–14 days, 24% (0.76; 0.70–0.84) at 15–28 days and 17% (0.83; 0.77–0.89)at 29–59 days after vaccination. Early vaccination between 1 September and 15 November showed a greater reduction in IRR compared to later vaccination given after mid-November.
Conclusions: Influenza vaccination is associated with a reduction in incidence of stroke. This study sup-ports previous studies which have shown a beneficial association of influenza vaccination for stroke prevention.

Keywords:general practice, primary care, influenza vaccination, self controlled case series study, stroke, prevention, influenza, transient ischaemic attack
Subjects:A Medicine and Dentistry > A300 Clinical Medicine
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:18624
Deposited On:13 Sep 2015 13:38

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