Motion: the long and short of it

Cavanagh, Patrick and Mather, George (1989) Motion: the long and short of it. Spatial Vision, 4 (2-3). pp. 103-129. ISSN 0169-1015

Full content URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/156856889X00077

Full text not available from this repository.

Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Several authors have proposed that motion is analyzed by two separate processes: short-range and long-range. We claim that the differences between short-range and long-range motion phenomena are a direct consequence of the stimuli used in the two paradigms and are not evidence for the existence of two qualitatively different motion processes. We propose that a single style of motion analysis, similar to the well known Reichardt and Marr-Ullman motion detectors, underlies all motion phenomena. Although there are different detectors of this type specialized for different visual attributes (namely first-order and second-order stimuli), they all share the same mode of operation. We review the studies of second-order motion stimuli to show that they share the basic phenomena observed for first-order stimuli. The similarity across stimulus types suggests, not parallel streams of motion extraction, one short-range and passive and the other long-range and intelligent, but a concatenation of a common mode of initial motion extraction followed by a general inference process.

Keywords:animal, binocular vision, color vision, human, light, movement perception, physiology, review, visual adaptation, Adaptation, Ocular, Color Perception, Motion Perception, Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Vision, Binocular
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B140 Neuroscience
C Biological Sciences > C830 Experimental Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:16139
Deposited On:04 Dec 2014 14:25

Repository Staff Only: item control page