Non-competitive phenotypic differences can have a strong effect on ideal free distributions

Ruxton, Graeme D. and Humphries, Stuart and Farnsworth, Keith D. (2001) Non-competitive phenotypic differences can have a strong effect on ideal free distributions. Journal of Animal Ecology, 70 (1). pp. 25-32. ISSN 0021-8790

Full content URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-...

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Non-competitive phenotypic differences can have a strong effect on ideal free distributions

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Abstract

1. We present a model of the ideal free distribution (IFD) where differences between phenotypes other than those involved in direct competition for resources are considered. We show that these post-acquisitional differences can have a dramatic impact on the predicted distributions of individuals. 2. Specifically, we predict that, when the relative abilities of phenotypes are independent of location, there will be a continuum of mixed evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) distributions (where all phenotypes are present in all patches). 3. When the relative strengths of the post-acquisitional trait in the two phenotypes differ between patches, however, we predict only a single ESS at equilibrium. Further, this distribution may be fully or partially segregated (with the distribution of at least one phenotype being spatially restricted) but it will never be mixed. 4. Our results for post-acquisitional traits mirror those of Parker (1982) for direct competitive traits. This comparison illustrates that it does not matter whether individual differences are expressed before or after competition for resources, they will still exert considerable influence on the distribution of the individuals concerned.

Keywords:competition, evolutionarily stable strategy, phenotype, energy efficiency, post-acquisitional traits, resource matching, resource partitioning, segregation
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C180 Ecology
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
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ID Code:15282
Deposited On:28 Nov 2014 12:44

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