Nanomechanical investigation of soft biological cell adhesion using atomic force microscopy

Siamantouras, Eleftherios and Hills, Claire E. and Squires, Paul E. and Liu, Kuo-Kang (2015) Nanomechanical investigation of soft biological cell adhesion using atomic force microscopy. Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering, 8 (1). pp. 22-31. ISSN 1865-5025

Full content URL: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12195-01...

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Nanomechanical investigation of soft biological cell adhesion using atomic force microscopy

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Nanomechanical investigation of soft biological cell adhesion using atomic force microscopy
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Abstract

Mechanical coupling between living cells is a complex process that is important for a variety of biological processes. In this study the effects of specific biochemical treatment on cell-to-cell adhesion and single cell mechanics were systematically investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) single cell force spectroscopy. Functionalised AFM tipless cantilevers were used for attaching single suspended cells that were brought in contact with substrate cells. Cell-to-cell adhesion parameters, such as maximum unbinding force (F max) and work or energy of detachment (W D), were extracted from the retraction force–displacement (F–d) curves. AFM indentation experiments were performed by indenting single cells with a spherical microbead attached to the cantilever. Hertzian contact model was applied to determine the elastic modulus (E) of single cells. Following treatment of the cells with neutralising antibody for epithelial (E)-cadherin, F max was increased by 25%, whereas W D decreased by 11% in response to a 43% increase in E. The results suggest that although the adhesion force between cells was increased after treatment, the energy of adhesion was decreased due to the reduced displacement separation as manifested by the loss of elastic deformation. Conclusively, changes in single cell mechanics are important underlying factors contributing to cell-to-cell adhesion and hence cytomechanical characterization is critical for cell adhesion measurements.

Keywords:AFM-SCFS, Elasticity, Beta-cells, Indentation, Cell mechanics, bmjgoldcheck, NotOAChecked
Subjects:H Engineering > H673 Bioengineering
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:15025
Deposited On:23 Sep 2014 11:52

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