The DSM 5 and the politics of diagnosing transpeople

Davy, Zowie (2014) The DSM 5 and the politics of diagnosing transpeople. In: School of Psychology Seminar Series, 19th February 2014, University of Lincoln.

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Abstract

To understand pursuing gender transition within psychiatry today we must recognize the way that the DSM authors (APA, 1980, 1994, 2013) are caught up in the continuities and temporalities of hegemonic and stereotypical cultural designations of male/female, masculinity/femininity, heterosexual/homosexual–if one does not play or function according to one’s original genitals and display the accompanying ‘distress’ surrounding them–dysphoria–you will not fit the model that may steer you then to the transitioning care pathways. This is in spite of behavioral and social scientists arguing that there are no pathological sexual deviations, only alternative designations, and if viewed through liberationist politics scholarship, that these ‘conditions’ are merely social designations that are non-determinable whilst being either acceptable or condemned by (psychiatrists and) society. I will pay close attention to the contestations of the DSM made by the trans anti-pathologisation movement. Some trans advocates suggest insisting on care pathways and legal assistance for those people who need to have a body different to their natal morphology and/or gender assignment beyond a psychiatric frame. They argue that if we look to other jurisdictions this can be accomplished.

Keywords:Politics of diagnosis, transgender, DSM-5, Medicolegal
Subjects:L Social studies > L431 Health Policy
L Social studies > L510 Health & Welfare
L Social studies > L320 Gender studies
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
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ID Code:15019
Deposited On:21 Sep 2014 20:29

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