E-cadherin and cell adhesion: a role in architecture and function in the pancreatic islet

Rogers, Gareth J. and Hodgkin, Matthew N. and Squires, Paul E. (2007) E-cadherin and cell adhesion: a role in architecture and function in the pancreatic islet. Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry, 20 (6). pp. 987-994. ISSN 1015-8987

Full content URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000110459

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Abstract

Background/Aims: The efficient secretion of insulin from beta-cells requires extensive intra-islet communication. The cell surface adhesion protein epithelial (E)-cadherin (ECAD) establishes and maintains epithelial tissues such as the islets of Langerhans. In this study, the role of ECAD in regulating insulin secretion from pseudoislets was investigated. Methods: The effect of an immuno-neutralising ECAD on gross morphology, cytosolic calcium signalling, direct cell-to-cell communication and insulin secretion was assessed by fura-2 microfluorimetry, Lucifer Yellow dye injection and insulin ELISA in an insulin-secreting model system. Results: Antibody blockade of ECAD reduces glucose-evoked changes in [Ca2+](i) and insulin secretion. Neutralisation of ECAD causes a breakdown in the glucose-stimulated synchronicity of calcium oscillations between discrete regions within the pseudoislet, and the transfer of dye from an individual cell within a cell cluster is attenuated in the absence of ECAD ligation, demonstrating that gap junction communication is disrupted. The functional consequence of neutralising ECAD is a significant reduction in insulin secretion. Conclusion: Cell adhesion via ECAD has distinct roles in the regulation of intercellular communication between beta-cells within islets, with potential repercussions for insulin secretion. Copyright (C) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

Keywords:Human islet
Subjects:Library of Congress Subject Areas > Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Library of Congress Subject Areas > Q Science > QP Physiology
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:14080
Deposited On:20 Apr 2011 15:45

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