Reaching socially excluded young people: a national study of street-based youth work

Crimmens, david and Factor, Fiona and Jeffs, Tony and Pitts, John and Pugh, Carole and Spence, Jean and Turner, Penelope (2004) Reaching socially excluded young people: a national study of street-based youth work. National Youth Agency, Leicester. ISBN 0861553101

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Item Type:Book or Monograph
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Detached youth work is at the most informal end of state sponsored interventions with young people outside school. As such it continues to reflect the core philosophy and principles of the traditions of English youth work, which emphasise voluntary involvement by young people. Detached youth work is therefore only possible with the clear and explicit consent of the young people who are worked with. The research was carried out in the context of both the emergence of the Connexions Service and the ‘Transforming Youth Work’ government policy. While the former was clearly committed to engaging a population of socially excluded young people who were not in education, employment or training (NEETs), the latter provided additional funding on the basis of a centrally defined curriculum of purposeful activities. As such the research highlighted the potential contradictions between engaging young people, particularly those groups who traditionally avoid engagement by state agencies - social inclusion – and the regulatory tendencies of New Labour’s social investment state.

Additional Information:Detached youth work is at the most informal end of state sponsored interventions with young people outside school. As such it continues to reflect the core philosophy and principles of the traditions of English youth work, which emphasise voluntary involvement by young people. Detached youth work is therefore only possible with the clear and explicit consent of the young people who are worked with. The research was carried out in the context of both the emergence of the Connexions Service and the ‘Transforming Youth Work’ government policy. While the former was clearly committed to engaging a population of socially excluded young people who were not in education, employment or training (NEETs), the latter provided additional funding on the basis of a centrally defined curriculum of purposeful activities. As such the research highlighted the potential contradictions between engaging young people, particularly those groups who traditionally avoid engagement by state agencies - social inclusion – and the regulatory tendencies of New Labour’s social investment state.
Keywords:Social exclusion, Youth work
Subjects:L Social studies > L530 Youth Work
L Social studies > L410 UK Social Policy
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:1285
Deposited On:05 Oct 2007

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