Development of an evidence-based practice guideline for UK public health nurses (health visitors) to use with parents of infants at risk of obesity

Redsell, Sarah A. and Edmonds, Barry A. and Glazebrook, Cris and Swift, Judy A. and Nathan, Dilip and Siriwardena, A. Niroshan and Weng, Stephen F. and Atkinson, Philippa and Watson, Vicki (2013) Development of an evidence-based practice guideline for UK public health nurses (health visitors) to use with parents of infants at risk of obesity. In: European Childhood Obesity Group (ECOG) Congress, November 12-15th, 2013, Liverpool, UK.

Documents
Development of an evidence-based practice guideline for UK public health nurses (health visitors) to use with parents of infants at risk of obesity
Poster
[img]
[Download]
[img]
Preview
PDF
Obesity SR ECOG 12.11.13.pdf - Whole Document
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

2MB
Item Type:Conference or Workshop contribution (Poster)
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

Introduction: Evidence about effective interventions that reduce obesity risk during infancy is needed. This project aimed to systematically review published Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) of behavioural and non-behavioural interventions which address potential risk factors for obesity to inform a guideline for UK health visitors.
Methods: A multiprofessional Guideline Development Group (GDG) was convened to undertake a systematic review, based on the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines. Findings from the review were used to develop a guideline which was subsequently externally reviewed by national experts and practitioners.
Results: We identified 28 RCTs reporting behavioural and non-behavioural interventions delivered during infancy with breastfeeding and/or weight outcomes measured during the first two years of life. A number of on-going studies were also identified. Inclusion criteria for intervention studies included parental breastfeeding intentions and first time parents. Good evidence exists for breastfeeding promotion and support interventions. Evidence exists for parental education around responsive feeding, aspects of infant diet and soothing/sleep expectations. These behavioural components informed the guideline. Despite good evidence that infants fed lower protein formula milk gained less weight compared to milk with higher protein levels, it was not possible to incorporate the evidence from the non-behavioural studies into the guideline.
Conclusion: Further research is needed to establish clinically effective interventions for obesity prevention during infancy. Continuous dialogue between commissioners, policy makers, health visitors and parents is essential to ensure existing UK policies are not a barrier to implementing obesity prevention strategies in the first year of life.

Keywords:childhood obesity, prevention, infant feeding, risk factors, primary care, health visitors, systematic review, randomised controlled trial
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B712 Health Visiting
A Medicine and Dentistry > A300 Clinical Medicine
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
Related URLs:
ID Code:12593
Deposited On:22 Dec 2013 23:59

Repository Staff Only: item control page