Setting process of lime-based conservation mortars with barium hydroxide

Karatasios, Ioannis and Kilikoglou, Vassilis and Colston, Belinda and Watt, David (2007) Setting process of lime-based conservation mortars with barium hydroxide. Cement and Concrete Research, 37 (6). pp. 886-893. ISSN 0008-8846

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Full text URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cemconres.2007.03.007

Abstract

This paper presents the effect of barium hydroxide on the setting mechanism of lime-based conservation mortars, when used as an additive material. The study focuses on the monitoring of the setting process and the identification of the mineral phases formed, which are essential for furthering the study of the durability of barium mixtures against chemical degradation. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal analysis (DTA–TG) were used to monitor the setting processes of these mixtures and identify new phases formed. The results suggest that barium hydroxide is evenly distributed within the lime and produces a homogeneous binding material, consisting of calcite (CaCO3), witherite (BaCO3) and barium–calcium carbonate [BaCa(CO3)2]. Finally, it was found that barium carbonate can be directly bonded to calcitic aggregates and therefore increases its chemical compatibility with the binding material

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:This paper presents the effect of barium hydroxide on the setting mechanism of lime-based conservation mortars, when used as an additive material. The study focuses on the monitoring of the setting process and the identification of the mineral phases formed, which are essential for furthering the study of the durability of barium mixtures against chemical degradation. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal analysis (DTA–TG) were used to monitor the setting processes of these mixtures and identify new phases formed. The results suggest that barium hydroxide is evenly distributed within the lime and produces a homogeneous binding material, consisting of calcite (CaCO3), witherite (BaCO3) and barium–calcium carbonate [BaCa(CO3)2]. Finally, it was found that barium carbonate can be directly bonded to calcitic aggregates and therefore increases its chemical compatibility with the binding material
Keywords:Architectural conservation, Conservation mortars
Subjects:K Architecture, Building and Planning > K250 Conservation of Buildings
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:1159
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:13 Sep 2007
Last Modified:13 Apr 2012 16:22

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