14C autoradiography with a novel wafer scale CMOS Active Pixel Sensor

Esposito, M. and Anaxagoras, T. and Larner, J. and Allinson, N. M. and Wells, K. (2013) 14C autoradiography with a novel wafer scale CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. Journal of Instrumentation, 8 (1). ISSN 1748-0221

Full content URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1748-0221/8/01/C01011

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Item Type:Article
Item Status:Live Archive

Abstract

14C autoradiography is a well established technique for structural and metabolic analysis of cells and tissues. The most common detection medium for this application is film emulsion, which offers unbeatable spatial resolution due to its fine granularity but at the same time has some limiting drawbacks such as poor linearity and rapid saturation. In recent years several digital detectors have been developed, following the technological transition from analog to digital-based detection systems in the medical and biological field. Even so such digital systems have been greatly limited by the size of their active area (a few square centimeters), which have made them unsuitable for routine use in many biological applications where sample areas are typically � 10-100 cm2. The Multidimensional Integrated Intelligent Imaging (MI3-Plus) consortium has recently developed a new large area CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (12.8 cm � 13.1 cm). This detector, based on the use of two different pixel resolutions, is capable of providing simultaneously low noise and high dynamic range on a wafer scale. In this paper we will demonstrate the suitability of this detector for routine beta autoradiography in a comparative approach with widely used film emulsion. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd and Sissa Medialab srl.

Keywords:Biological applications, CMOS active pixel sensors, Comparative approach, Intelligent imaging, Metabolic analysis, Technological transition, VLSI electronics, Well-established techniques, Emulsification, Sensors, Tissue, Radiography
Subjects:G Mathematical and Computer Sciences > G740 Computer Vision
Divisions:College of Science > School of Computer Science
ID Code:11551
Deposited On:02 Dec 2013 15:46

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