Normalising the unthinkable: the British press, torture and the human rights of terror suspects

Tulloch, John (2005) Normalising the unthinkable: the British press, torture and the human rights of terror suspects. Ethical Space: the International Journal of Communication Ethics, 2 (4). pp. 25-32. ISSN 1742-0105

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Normalising the unthinkable: the British press, torture and the human rights of terror suspects
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Abstract

This paper explores contemporary media coverage
of torture by examining in detail the editorial positions
taken on the issue of “extraordinary rendition” by UK national daily and weekly newspapers during December 2005. It explores the historic origins of the myths dominating mainstream media coverage of torture drawing on comparisons with UK press coverage of brutality by British forces in
previous emergencies, including conflicts in Kenya and Northern Ireland. In addition, it discusses the extent to which the contemplation of the use of torture in anti-terrorism strategies has been normalised in the process of media debate. In conclusion, the 2005 “rendition” controversy suggests that dominant myths surrounding British uses of torture are “alive and well”.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Torture, Journalism, Media
Subjects:P Mass Communications and Documentation > P500 Journalism
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Journalism
ID Code:1135
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:07 Sep 2007
Last Modified:10 Jun 2013 17:08

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