The news agenda of the black African press in the United Kingdom

Ogunyemi, Olatunji (2007) The news agenda of the black African press in the United Kingdom. Journal of Black Studies, 37 (5). pp. 630-654. ISSN 0021-9347

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0021934706297224

Abstract

The proliferation of ethnic press in the United Kingdom has enabled the ethnic communities to represent themselves in the public sphere, to contest negative stereotypes, and to receive information with Blacks as central subjects. However, the perception of Black people as one Black group has skewed our understanding of how different groups within the Black communities project their linguistic and visual distinctiveness through their media. Subsequently, we have little understanding of the press for and by Black African diasporas in the United Kingdom. Therefore, the article explores the dynamic relationship between the Black African community and its press through a case study of African Voice, interview with the editor, and audience survey. Furthermore, it explores the news agenda of the African Voice from the theoretical paradigms of alternative and tabloid popular press. It concludes that the African Voice is neither an alternative press nor tabloid popular press but leans towards semiserious press

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:The proliferation of ethnic press in the United Kingdom has enabled the ethnic communities to represent themselves in the public sphere, to contest negative stereotypes, and to receive information with Blacks as central subjects. However, the perception of Black people as one Black group has skewed our understanding of how different groups within the Black communities project their linguistic and visual distinctiveness through their media. Subsequently, we have little understanding of the press for and by Black African diasporas in the United Kingdom. Therefore, the article explores the dynamic relationship between the Black African community and its press through a case study of African Voice, interview with the editor, and audience survey. Furthermore, it explores the news agenda of the African Voice from the theoretical paradigms of alternative and tabloid popular press. It concludes that the African Voice is neither an alternative press nor tabloid popular press but leans towards semiserious press
Keywords:Taboo themes, Black African press
Subjects:P Mass Communications and Documentation > P500 Journalism
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Journalism
ID Code:1132
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:07 Sep 2007
Last Modified:11 Aug 2014 16:53

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